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CLEVELAND DICKENS FELLOWSHIP

 



Calendar


Meetings

Cleveland Dickens Fellowship of Cleveland, Ohio, Branch No. 177, established in 1984, meets monthly from September through December and February through June to study and enjoy the works of Charles Dickens, his life and times. Join us at one of the County Libraries' meeting rooms. (Check Calendar.) All meetings are free and open to the public.

Membership

To join the Cleveland Dickens Fellowship, come to a meeting and pay your dues.


Contact us

Dickens PowerPoint

In honor of Dickens's 200th birthday celebrated in 2012, Cleveland branch created a PowerPoint slide presentation appropriate for a single class or a meeting of adults of all ages. To request this free, entertaining and informative overview of Charles Dickens, the man himself, the characters of his imagination, the strong ties between his life events and his work, and his rock star celebrity, email Beth Bliss or Paul Siedel.

International Fellowship

The International Dickens Fellowship was founded in 1902. Its objectives were "to knit together in a common bond of friendship lovers of the great master of humor and pathos, Charles Dickens," to spread the love of humanity, to campaign against those "social evils" that most concerned Dickens, and " to assist in the preservation and purchase of buildings and objects associated with his name or mentioned in his works." One of those special buildings is The Charles Dickens Museum, 48 Doughty Street, London.

Branches of the Fellowship now exist around the world, from Japan to Argentina and from India to Australia.

The Dickensian

Edited by Malcolm Andrews, The Dickensian, combining contributions from academic as well as lay enthusiasts, leads Dickensian criticism around the world. Its headquarters, along with headquarters for the Fellowship, is in the Dickens House Museum, 48 Doughty Street, London, the home of Charles Dickens from 1837 to 1839.
As a member of the Cleveland Fellowship, Branch 177, you may subscribe at a reduced rate to the journal The Dickensian which is published three times a year. The published price for members runs about $24.00 USD. Use the link above to access the subscription form.

General Meeting

Each year the International Fellowship gets together for study, entertainment and fun.

We look forward to the Annual International Conference 15-20 July 2020 in London, UK. 


 

RELATED SITES


THE DICKENS PAGE, A VERY USEFUL SITE.

THE VICTORIAN WEB, SO FULL OF INFORMATION IT'S EASY TO GET LOST IN IT.

THE DICKENS PROJECT, UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, WHICH INCLUDES THE DICKENS UNIVERSE.

DAVID PERDUE'S DICKENS PAGE, INFORMATION, OPPORTUNITIES AND EXPERIENCES


BRANCHES

JAPAN

MELBOURNE

FRIENDS OF DICKENS, NEW YORK

PHILADELPHIA

PITTSBURGH

TORONTO

CHICAGO




BOOK OF THE YEAR: THE OLD CURIOSITY SHOP

HERE'S A FREE DOWNLOAD FROM US. USE THE LINK BELOW TO READ OR PRINT.

"FAGIN, RIAH, AND THE POWERS OF MYTH"
AN ESSAY ON DICKENS'S TREATMENT OF JEWS BY JOAN FREILICH, DECEASED MEMBER OF THE CLEVELAND DICKENS FELLOWSHIP

NEWSLETTERS


A TWIST OF DICKENS
OFFICIAL NEWSLETTER OF THE CLEVELAND DICKENS FELLOWSHIP
PUBLISHED THREE TIMES EACH YEAR

MAY, 2019


SEPTEMBER 2019

ETWIST

CLEVELAND FELLOWSHIP'S ELECTRONIC NEWSLETTER AVAILABLE SEVERAL TIMES DURING THE YEAR: WHAT'S HAPPENING NOW, IN THE INTERNATIONAL FELLOWSHIP AND ON THE WEB

LATEST ETWIST

PREVIOUS ETWIST

SEND US YOUR EMAIL ADDRESS SO WE CAN LET YOU KNOW WHEN A NEW NEWSLETTER IS AVAILABLE. WRITE US AT K.SCHUERGER@OUTLOOK.COM

( FOR A FREE DOWNLOAD OF ACROBAT READER, CLICK ON THE LINK BELOW)

HTTP://WWW.DOWNLOAD.COM/ADOBE-READER/3000-2378_4-10000062.HTM

 
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"Something will turn up!"

Wilkins Micawber

 

[Dickens] seems almost as unstable as Dostoevsky. He was capable of great hardness and
cruelty, and not merely towards those whom he had cause to resent: people who patronized or
intruded on him. On one occasion, in the presence of other guests, he ordered Forster out of his
house over some discussion that had arisen at dinner; and his treatment of Mrs. Dickens suggests
. . . the behavior of a Renaissance monarch summarily consigning to a convent the wife who had
served her turn. There is more of emotional reality behind Quilp in The Old Curiosity Shop than
there is behind Little Nell. If Little Nell sounds bathetic today, Quilp has lost none of his
fascination. He is ugly, malevolent, perverse; he delights in making mischief for its own sake,
yet he exercises over the members of his household a power which is almost an attraction and
which resembles what was known in Dickens’ day as “malicious animal magnetism.” Though
Quilp is ceaselessly tormenting his wife and browbeating the boy who works for him, they never
attempt to escape: they admire him; in a sense they love him
Edmund Wilson in The Wound and the Bow